Market news

Show news:


10.06.2019 18:39

UK growth numbers for April look dreadful at face value - ING

James Smith, a developed markets economist at ING, notes that real GDP fell by 0.4% on the month, although this is almost entirely down to a Brexit-related correction in manufacturing.

  • "UK-based firms significantly built levels of inventory during the first quarter, and while by definition much of this was sourced from Europe, UK manufacturing production also received a temporary boost. But as it became clear that the ‘no deal’ risk had been postponed with the Article 50 extension, firms began to grapple with what to do with all the extra stock. As the PMI indicators have also signalled, first and foremost this has meant a fall in production, which declined by 3.9% month-on-month – the sharpest such fall since 2002.
  • It’s also worth noting that several firms said they were planning to bring forward their annual shutdown to April. This period, which typically lasts for two weeks over the summer to allow time for co-ordinated vacation as well as factory refitting/retooling, was made earlier in some cases to insulate against the initial impact of a ‘no deal’ exit.
  • All of this raises the possibility that growth could come in negative for the second quarter as a whole, but either way, it should largely prove temporary. That said, the wider growth story continues to look fairly bleak. While consumer spending may be a little stronger given the modest improvement in real wage growth, investment is likely to continue falling over the summer as Brexit uncertainty weighs on decision-making.
  • We, therefore, think it is unlikely that the Bank of England will hike rates during 2019, although we’d continue to flag that recent hawkish commentary from Governor Mark Carney suggests that a November move shouldn’t be 100% ruled out if Article 50 is extended further.
  • In reality though, raising concerns about a possible ‘no deal’ Brexit, as well as the growing likelihood of a general election in the autumn, make it more likely that the central bank remains on hold through this year."


Keep up with latest Forex market news updates: Currencies, central banks, economic indicators for oil and gold trading – all you need to work effectively on Forex.

Market focus

October 2019
  • 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

Forex is open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week (except national holidays), and it can be broken up to the following four regional markets: Australia and Oceania, Asia, Europe, and America. A Forex trading session opens at 23:00 GMT on Sunday in Japan and closes at 22:00 GMT on Friday in the USA.

 
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
Pacific Wellington 19:00 04:00 22:00 07:00 22:00 07:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
Sydney 21:00 06:00 00:00 09:00 00:00 09:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
Asian Tokyo 23:00 08:00 02:00 11:00 02:00 11:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
Hong Kong, Singapore 00:00 09:00 03:00 12:00 03:00 12:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
European Frankfurt, Zurich, Paris 06:00 15:00 09:00 18:00 9:00 18:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenCloseе
London 07:00 16:00 10:00 19:00 10:00 19:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
American New York 12:00 21:00 15:00 00:00 15:00 00:00
Session Financial Centres UTC/GMT
OpenClose
EET
OpenClose
Local Time
OpenClose
Chicago 13:00 22:00 16:00 01:00 16:00 01:00